Uppsala University has developed an all-organic proton battery that can be charged in a second


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Content by: Payal |


By every going day, we are closing to the total finish of the non-renewable sources of energy responsible for carrying out all our daily life requirements as well as running the critical strategic industries worldwide. Their absence would be nothing less than a global catastrophe. But here comes with a solution to this, the Uppsala universities with their all-new organic protonic battery. With the help of efficient energy storage renewable electric energy can be used for various processes, leading to saving of the non-renewable energy source from exploitation.

This new technology has also managed to overcome many of the efficiency depleting factors of the new battery technology like pollution due to manufacture and functioning, capacity drop with the no of uses. It can be charged and discharged 500 times without significant loss in performance. Christian Strietzel of Uppsala university Material Science and Engineering department said: "I am sure that many people are aware that the standard performance of batteries declines at low temperature, we have demonstrated that this organic battery retains properties such as capacity down to as low as -24 centigrade."

Stietzel added, "the point of our research has been to develop a battery built from elements commonly found in nature, to create organic battery materials."

As according to 2018 reports lithium and cobalt will be critical to be found by 2050 quinone found plentiful in nature as it is formed during the photosynthesis has been chosen as an active element. An acidic aqueous solution is also there to prevent the harmful effects on the environment and check flaming.

"There remains a great deal of development to be done before its available in households, however this is a long stride to making sustainable organic batteries," said Strietzel.

Maybe this would bring dawn to the recent undergrowth of the energy production.




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